Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Civil War Uniform

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Although "the Blue and the Gray" succinctly evokes the North and the South, in actuality, the uniforms of the Civil War soldiers were anything but "uniform"-neither in color nor any other facet. Uniforms of the Civil War fully explores this fascinating branch of military history, presenting an in-depth study of the many and varied uniforms worn by Northern and Southern soldiers.While the most notable feature of the uniform of the was, in fact, its regulation dark blue color, the Confederates had much more variation, with uniforms ranging from the familiar gray to "butternut." The many styles and colors worn by the South are presented in a state-by-state survey. The North is covered in similar depth, detailing the uniforms and equipment of the regular army, including infantry, cavalry, and artillery.Uniforms of the Civil WarUniforms is an especially rich source for reenactors and all Civil War enthusiasts

Civi war Musket

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There were two types of musket; the matchlock and the flintlock, which could be as long as five feet and had a firing range of up to 300 yards. They were both loaded in the same way; gunpowder was poured into the barrel and packed in hard with a stick. Civil war Musket Then the lead ball would be put in followed by wadding to hold the ball in place.To fire the matchlock, the most common type of musket, the soldier would empty gunpowder into a pan and cover it to protect it. He would then press a lighted piece of flax into a metal trigger called the serpent. When the gun was fired the lighted flax in the serpent would come down into the pan and light the gunpowder. The flame from this would then enter the barrel of the gun and ignite the gunpowder that had been poured into it and the lead ball would be fired.FlintlockTo fire the flintlock was slightly easier but more expensive. The pan would be filled in the same way but the serpent contained a piece of flint which, when it struck the pan, would produce a spark which would ignite the gunpowder.Both weapons were dangerous and clumsy to use. Some of the longer muskets needed a rest to balance the barrel on because they were too heavy to hold. They were impossible to reload quickly and were most effective when a group of musketeers fired a volley of shots at the enemy.

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